Accessibility

RAA Defails

0

Regiments

0

Batteries

0

Branches

Regiments

1 Regt RHA

1 Regt RHA

PROVIDE ARMOURED ARTILLERY SUPPORT 1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery is an armoured artillery regiment.  Its primary role is to provide combat... read more

3 Regt RHA

3 Regt RHA

THE LIGHT GUN Equipped with 105mm Light Gun, 3rd Regiment RHA provide agile, mobile and quick artillery support as part of the adaptive force. The L... read more

4 Regt RA

4 Regt RA

REGIMENTAL LIFE 4th Regiment Royal Artillery exists to provide combat support to both Infantry and Cavalry Regiments. We have a proud and successful... read more

5 Regt RA

5 Regt RA

read more

7 Para RHA

7 Para RHA

read more

12 Regt RA

12 Regt RA

CLOSE SUPPORT AIR DEFENCE We specialise in delivering vital Close Support Air Defence to the UK’s manoeuvre forces, providing protection to cri... read more

14 Regt RA

14 Regt RA

read more

16 Regt RA

16 Regt RA

read more

19 Regt RA

19 Regt RA

read more

26 Regt RA

26 Regt RA

read more

29 Cdo RA

29 Cdo RA

read more

32 Regt RA

32 Regt RA

ACTIVE FROM - 1939 ROLE - REACTIVE FORCE SPECIALISM - FIND-TRACK read more

47 Regt RA

47 Regt RA

THE ARMY'S TACTICAL UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (TUAS) REGIMENT 47th Regiment Royal Artillery is the Army’s only Regiment able to fly the Watchkeep... read more

101 Regt RA

101 Regt RA

read more

103 Regt RA

103 Regt RA

read more

Kings Tp, RHA

Kings Tp, RHA

MOUNTED CEREMONIAL BATTERY As Her Majesty’s Mounted Ceremonial Battery, the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery role includes the firing o... read more

Honourable Artillery Company

Honourable Artillery Company

read more

106 Regt RA

106 Regt RA

read more

105 Regt RA

105 Regt RA

read more

104 Regt RA

104 Regt RA

read more

Batteries

Use the search bar below to view information regarding our Royal Artillery Battery's, past and present...

27/5

Néry Day

Original Title: 2 Troop, Bengal Horse Artillery
Present Title: K (Hondeghem) Battery, Royal Artillery
Status: Active
Date: 4 August 1809
Website: http://www.army.mod.uk/artillery/regiments/24678.aspx
K Battery was formed by the East India Company as 2nd Troop Bengal Horse Artillery on the 4th of August 1809 in Acra, India. In the 1930’s, K Battery returned to Britain and in 1937 assumed the duties of the Riding Troop at St Johns Wood. In 1939, the battery was the last RHA battery to become fully mechanised, being armed with First World War Mk11 18 Pdr guns. At outbreak of the Second World War, K Battery, consisting of D, E and F Troops, joined newly formed 5th RHA serving alongside G Battery, as part of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and deployed to France in 1940. Under the heavy Blitzkrieg from the Germans, as they streamed through Belgium, the battery was forced to retreat. The small village of Hondeghem lay on one of the Germans' main lines of advance and it became essential to the BEF to secure and hold at all costs. The only troops available were K Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, along with four 18 Pdr guns and a detachment of 1 officer and 80 men of the 2nd Search Light Regiment. The Battery suffered heavy losses, with 'F' Troop alone losing 45 men out of 63. The battery successfully slowed the German advance long enough to enable the evacuation from the beaches at Dunkirk. It is from the valiant efforts from the soldiers of K Battery and the result of the battle which ensued on the 27 May 1940 that the honorary title of Hondeghem was granted to K Battery on 24 January 1951, which is still carried by the battery today.

Branches

Click here to find your nearest branch and join the Regimental Family

Great Gunners

Col Albert Borgard, The first Colonel of the Royal Artillery

Col Albert Borgard, The first Colonel of the Royal Artillery

Year: 1716
Rank/Regt: Foundation of The Royal Regiment of Artillery. Prior to 1716, trains of artillery were raised for specific campaigns; the guns were manned by minimally trained gun detachments and commanded by a master gunner; they were dependent on non-combatant carters and their horses for movement. By the early 18th Century, the shortcomings of this system were well known. Under these terms, in 1704, a siege company of artillery was raised in London to man the defences of Gibraltar and a field company to support the Minorca garrison; these were subsequently subsumed within the Royal Artillery. The difficulties in raising a Train of Artillery in a timely manner to meet the threat of the 1715 Jacobite Rising may have been the catalyst to the formation of a regular Train of Artillery. A Royal Warrant dated 26 May 1716 authorised the establishment of a permanently manned Train of Artillery of two companies at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich under the Board of Ordnance. It was renamed Royal Artillery in 1722 when the Gibraltar and Minorca Trains of Artillery were integrated within the Royal Artillery. Col Albert Borgard, a Dane, was appointed the first Colonel of the Royal Artillery; and Lt Col, subsequently Lt Gen, Jonas Watson became Chief Bombardier of England; he was also Master Gunner of Whitehall and St James's Park from 1710 to 1741.